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We think you’ll agree, one of the best things about our rural communities is how we rally together and show love to our neighbors in time of need. We created the Love Your Neighbor project as a way to do just that — where local makers can use their gifts and talents to create meaningful pieces, and you can give back and purchase with purpose.

 
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Helping Rural Flood Victims in
Nebraska and Southwest Iowa

 


Earlier this spring, in a perfect storm of heavy rainfall and rapid snow melt, massive flooding struck many farms, ranches, and rural communities in southwest Iowa and Nebraska — and many suffered astronomical losses.

 
 
  • Entire farmsteads were completely washed away.

  • Entire communities were evacuated because of the rapidly rising waters and levee breaks, leaving many families stranded.

  • It happened right during calving season and mamas and their new babies had nowhere to go — either trapped in snow drifts as high as the rooftops, stuck on a small island with no way to get them feed, or simply washed away in the flood waters.

  • Farmers could not get feed to the farms or trucks out to grind hay.

  • Equipment was swept away.

  • Bins full of grain were submerged in water.

  • Towns had no way to keep the grocery store shelves stocked, as delivery trucks could not make it to them.

  • Mail was suspended.

  • And lives were lost.

 
 

While the flood waters have now receded, the restoration and rebuilding process has just begun and the need is still great. In an area of the country known for helping themselves and not asking for a handout, we have been truly inspired by the strength, will, and determination of so many people who have suffered great losses. And we want to make sure these farmers, ranchers, and rural communities get the help they need.

We’ve created a line of products all designed by rural makers (who also happen to be farm girls) to raise money to help our neighbors in need. We’ll be taking preorders for each item throughout the month of May. Shipping is free, and a portion of all proceeds go to help flood victims in rural Nebraska and Southwest Iowa. We will be donating specifically to two reputable organizations: the Nebraska Cattlemen Disaster Relief Fund and the Omaha Community Foundation - Southwest Iowa Flood Fund.

 
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We’ll also be donating $10 from all Rural Revival Supply
t-shirts and hats purchased during the month of May!

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MEET THE MAKERS

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Michelle Myers of Dirt Road Candle Co. grew up on her family farm in SW Iowa where she and her husband, Steve, are the fourth generation to farm the Century Farm where they live. She started pouring all natural soy candles from her dirt road farm as a way to rid her home of the "farm smells" that she and Steve would bring home after a long day working at the farm. It is important to her to support the Ag industry through using 100% American grown soy wax in her candles, so you will notice a clean even burning soot-free candle with every burn! She continues to craft all the smell goods pouring up candles, wax melts, air sprays, car freshies and more.

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Linley Cavin of Matted Ink grew up on a hog & crop farm in northeast Iowa, where her love for rural living began. Matted Ink is a lifestyle brand that was formed out of Linley's passion for design and typography - specializing in spreading positivity through tees, art prints, mugs and home decor. Linley and her husband, Jess, recently moved back to rural northeast Iowa to get involved with their family-owned feed, grain, and agronomy business. 

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Regan Doely of Doe A Deer grew up on the farm in northwest Iowa where she was surrounded by two of the hardest working people she’s ever known, her grandpa and dad. Their hard work made an everlasting impact on her and inspired her to start her own business. Doe A Deer is a kitchen and lifestyle brand that offers a great collection of products that bring a hint of vintage and color to your home such as flour sack tea towels, notepads, mugs and more. Regan and her husband Dave now live in rural central Iowa. 

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Melissa Nelson of Hungry Canyon Design is a Nebraska farm and cattle gal who transplanted to Northwest Iowa after college to build an agricultural education non-profit and marry an Iowa farm boy. Her farm background and creative, entrepreneurial spirit allow her to put a unique spin on everyday items. She creates authentic and accurate agriculture-related cards, gifts and home decor from the farm and beef cattle operation she and her husband are so proud of. Melissa and her husband Mark have an almost one-year-old son, Roy, a seventh generation farm kid and lover of tractors and cows.  

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The BACKSTORY

After recording a recent podcast with Michelle Myers of Dirt Road Candle Co., we were talking about how we both felt called to do something as a way to give back to the farmers, ranchers, and rural communities in Iowa and Nebraska who have been faced with great losses from the spring flooding. Michelle already had a Love Your Neighbor candle in the works, with a portion of the proceeds going towards these flood victims. So, we thought, why not work together to create a Love Your Neighbor campaign and include other makers as well! The result is what you see here.

 
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Thank You

To you, our followers, for supporting this project and being a part of helping our rural neighbors in need.

To the makers, for pouring your heart and soul into pieces that represent an amazing message, and for using your platform and products to help give back.

To the farmers, ranchers, and rural citizens in Nebraska and Southwest Iowa for your perseverance, resilience, and determination to come back better than ever. You are an incredible inspiration and representation of rural America and the values that live here. We’re with you all the way.

 
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Why do farmers farm, given their economic adversities on top of the many frustrations and difficulties normal to farming? And always the answer is: love. They must do it for love.
— Wendell Berry