EPISODE 39 // MARY HEFFERNAN OF FIVE MARYS FARMS

EPISODE 39 // MARY HEFFERNAN OF FIVE MARYS FARMS

We’re sitting down with Mary Heffernan of Five Marys Farms. We met up at their M5 Burgerhouse in Fort Jones, California (pop. 839) to talk about all things Five Marys. Like, how she first discovered her love for small business, why she loves the rural life, the power of Instagram, and so much more. Mary is an entrepreneur at heart and you’ll be so inspired hearing how she and her family have built Five Marys from the ground up.

EPISODE 38 // BROOKE CLAY OF RURAL GONE URBAN

EPISODE 38 // BROOKE CLAY OF RURAL GONE URBAN

We recently met up with Brooke Clay of Rural Gone Urban as our travel paths were crossing in Tulsa, Oklahoma. We had a great conversation about the power of story, her Rural Influencer Project and what makes someone an influencer, and why the narrative is changing for rural America. Plus we let you in on the story behind The Ruralist and how that came to be.

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: THROWING AWAY THE BOX

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: THROWING AWAY THE BOX

In the last decade, something like 90 rural hospitals have closed. 20 of those are in Texas. The National Rural Health Association, our nation’s foremost advocates for rural healthcare, estimates that something close to 800 more rural hospitals are at risk of closing. That’s about one-third of all rural hospitals in the entire country. It helps a little to know that it’s not just us.

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: THERMOMETERS AND THERMOSTATS

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: THERMOMETERS AND THERMOSTATS

What are WE doing on a local level? Are we the thermometer, going with the flow of popular opinion? Or are we the thermostat, responsible for changing the temperature? Are we defending the status quo, giving silent or vocal sanction to the power structures of the community? Or are we the disturbers of the peace and the agitators, putting an end to hatred, injustice, and need within our realms?

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: THE VIRTUE OF EXTREMISM

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: THE VIRTUE OF EXTREMISM

Today, I ask you: what are we doing to improve the lives of those around us in rural America? Are we acting as extremists for love and the extension of justice? Are we working through our churches, our community organizations, our businesses, and our elected positions to ensure that all of our people prosper and are treated with the respect and dignity they deserve, no matter their net worth, skin color, or religious affiliation? Are we extremists like Dr. King and Jesus? Or are we the modern day descendants of the white moderate? Do we prefer an absence of tension to a positive peace, satisfying ourselves that we are a “silent majority” hoping for the flow of time to cure all ills, while we remain comfortable and inactive?

EPISODE 36 // RURAL VISIONARY CHRIS DEAL

EPISODE 36 // RURAL VISIONARY CHRIS DEAL

If you’re looking for rural development strategies, then this week’s podcast is for you! We’re sitting down with Chris Deal from Jefferson, Iowa (pop. 4,345) to talk about the amazing revitalization happening here. Chris moved back to his hometown to help with the family business, Deal’s Orchard, but his role in the community has since expanded way beyond that. He has had a key role in the revitalization of Jefferson and some exciting projects happening here.

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: 365 DAYS A YEAR

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: 365 DAYS A YEAR

It is often said that sharing a table and a meal is one of the most powerful, leveling experiences that a group of people can have together. Every year, I look across the dining room and I am reminded of the accuracy of that statement. I see people sitting side-by-side whose paths might never otherwise cross, from all ages, backgrounds, and creeds. Then I see something even more special. They don’t just wolf down a meal at the same table and then depart. They eat. Then they trade desserts. They re-fill each other’s drinks. They talk to each other’s kids. They visit about their lives. They STAY. Together.

WHAT. A. YEAR.

WHAT. A. YEAR.

It’s hard to believe that here we are on the last day of 2018. Seriously, What. A. Year. Last year at this time, Rural Revival was nothing more than a spark of an idea that I should start a podcast. I wanted to show people what’s possible in rural America through what is already happening here. And to look back on this year and see all that this has become? It overwhelms me in the best way.

EPISODE 34 // JEREMY MAHLER OF THE NINETEEN14

EPISODE 34 // JEREMY MAHLER OF THE NINETEEN14

This week on the podcast we’re sitting down with Jeremy Mahler of The Nineteen14 in Minburn, Iowa. The Nineteen14 is an old railroad depot that Jeremy turned into a restaurant that draws thousands of people each year — mostly through the local bike trail. As a creative and an entrepreneur, Jeremy is always involved in lots of fun projects. He’s also sharing why, after living and traveling all over the world, he decided to return to his roots in small town Iowa.

EPISODE 33 // NORM AND TERESA GIELDA OF THE DAVIS GENERAL

EPISODE 33 // NORM AND TERESA GIELDA OF THE DAVIS GENERAL

Norm and Teresa Gielda are the new owners of The Davis General - a modern day general store in the rural community of Boston, just on the outskirts of Franklin, Tennessee. This week on the podcast they’re sharing their story about how they chose to relocate from California to Tennessee and return to Teresa’s southern roots, and how becoming small business owners has helped them build community in a new place. 

DOS RIOS: A CUSTOM LEATHER SIDE HUSTLE

DOS RIOS: A CUSTOM LEATHER SIDE HUSTLE

It's no secret I love to stay busy. I finished my master's degree in nursing education, and still work as a nurse three days a week. However, I needed something to fill a creative void in my life. I needed a side hustle. So here I am, working three days in the clinic, making custom leather, and running a photography business. 

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: THE GOOD OLD DAYS AGAIN

ESSAYS FROM WEST OF 98: THE GOOD OLD DAYS AGAIN

The Grand Theatre beautifully sums up why the “good old days” are a complicated thing. Memories of the theatre span eight decades. Each generation remembers a different version of the theatre, each of which took place in a different era of the town’s history. But to that generation, their memory is the “good old days,“ and guess what? Each group is exactly right. 

IMAGES BY MOSCH: CAPTURING LOCAL LIFE AND LIGHT

IMAGES BY MOSCH: CAPTURING LOCAL LIFE AND LIGHT

Why New Providence? I get asked this regularly. It’s home for me and goodness, I am so thankful every day that I have grown a business in an area full of such supporting people. Everyone in this community treats you like family and they are so positive, always encouraging others, looking for a way to give a helping hand, and celebrating everything and everyone’s accomplishments. Why wouldn’t you want to surround yourself with that everyday?!

A HOMETOWN VETERAN KEEPING HIS LOCAL ROOTS STRONG

A HOMETOWN VETERAN KEEPING HIS LOCAL ROOTS STRONG

One definition of community is, “a feeling of fellowship with others as a result of sharing common attitudes, interests, and goals.” In my opinion, New Providence has just that, and other small communities should strive to have the same. Our small size keeps us together, focused, and driven to be successful as a whole. I’m proud to be part of a community that is dedicated to making the place we call home a little better each day.

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